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Top 10 Vitamin K And Its Need, Requirement And Precautions

Vitamin K

Vitamin K is one of the most recent additions to the group of vitamins and can be further divided into three forms. The first one is K1 also known as phylloquinone, K2 also known as menaquinone and K3 that’s better known as menadione. Vitamin K gets its name from the German word ‘koagulation’ and in German language ‘koagulation’ means blood clotting. This vitamin has been one of the most misjudged vitamins and there are too many misconceptions associated with this vitamin’s blood clotting ability. Blood clotting is an essential function of the body as it stops the blood from flowing out of the body in case of an injury.

Vitamin K Need and Requirement

Maintaining a healthy Vitamin K intake can also help prevent osteoporosis because Vitamin K along with calcium helps strengthen bones. The daily requirement of Vitamin K for those above 19 years of age is 90 mcg for women and 120 mcg for men. A Vitamin K deficiency is common among those who take certain drugs that mess up with the body’s ability to absorb Vitamin K. Just like Vitamin C, even Vitamin K deficiency is common among those who drink too much of alcohol.

Vitamin K Need and Requirement

Vitamin K Precautions

Vitamin K supplements should never be taken unless on a prescription that is prescribed by a qualified doctor. Women who are pregnant or lactating must always consult their doctor before taking any vitamin supplement or sources. Those who are on drugs and blood thinners provided by their doctors and medical practitioners for clotting disorders, high cholesterol or cardiac health need to discuss Vitamin K intake with them. That’s because the doctor would have individually diagnosed you and knows best the effects of the drugs prescribed.

Vitamin K Precautions

Here Are Top 10 Sources Of Vitamin K And Its Need, Requirement And Precautions:

Kale

Yet another nutritional benefit of kale is Vitamin K and just an ounce of raw kale contains 229 mcg of Vitamin K which is over twice the daily requirement of this vitamin. The more you know of kale’s nutritional benefits, the more you want to eat this super food that’s low in calories and rich in calcium, dietary fiber, iron, protein and Vitamin A. Kale strengthens bones and is said to have the ability to prevent osteoporosis as it is a rich source of calcium and Vitamin K.

Kale

Basil Leaves

With a pleasant aroma and good taste these leaves promote digestion and kill intestinal parasites. Basil leaves are also a good source of Vitamin K in both fresh and dry forms. The fresh basil leaves can be included in salads directly, while the dried ones are primarily used for seasoning. An ounce of fresh basil leaves contain 116 mcg of Vitamin K, while the same quantity of dried basil provides 480 mcg of Vitamin K. Those who are on a weight loss diet can benefit from basil as this herb can be added to salads for a good dose of Vitamin K and are low in calories.

Basil Leaves

Thyme

A tablespoon of ground thyme weighing four grams contains around 72.9 mcg of Vitamin K and that’s quite close to your daily requirement of this vitamin. Low in cholesterol and high in dietary fiber, this herb is easy to use in salads, soups and broths. If you bought some extra thyme then no worries, because this herb can be used as an antiseptic and can even be effective on fungal infections because it contains thymol. This flavorful herb has a pleasant fragrance and is rich in other nutrients such as Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, calcium and dietary fiber. These extra nutrients can help those on a weight loss diet cut down on other sources and thereby reduce calorie intake by getting two or even three nutrients for the price of one.

Thyme

Parsley

Parsley is Mediterranean herb that was used as medicine before the modern day cooks started using it for garnishing. An ounce of parsley can give over five times of the daily requirement of Vitamin K and is rich in other nutrients such as Vitamin A and Vitamin C. Low in calories, this herb is almost unnoticed because most people who cook at home skip garnishing assuming that its just decoration. Well, if you thought that way then you ought to know that parsley is rich in folic acid, B vitamins and dietary fiber and that’s good for the heart.

Parsley

Spring Onions 

Also known as scallions, spring onions are quite rich in Vitamin K. A hundred grams of spring onions contain as much as 207 mcg of Vitamin K. Spring onions are also rich in antioxidants such as lutien and carotene and other nutrients such as B complex vitamins, folates and Vitamin A. The fiber content and zero cholesterol make it an ideal source of Vitamin K for those who are on a weight loss diet. Spring onions have elongated roots and both the greens and the roots are usually chopped and used in salads, soups and also for garnishing.

Spring Onions

Collard Greens

A good reason to add collard to your poached eggs and beans is Vitamin K. An ounce of boiled collard with salt contains around 123 mcg of Vitamin K and that is over and above the required daily intake. However its not just Vitamin K that’s dominant in this green leafy vegetable. In fact collard greens are a good source of vitamins A, B2, B6 and E along with dietary fiber, iron, protein and calcium. Collard greens are best when tender so try to pick tender green leaves that don’t have any yellow spots on them.

Collard Greens

Arugula

Arugula, better known as rocket salad is an easy addition to burgers and sandwiches. Now here’s a reason to include more of it in your salads and that’s Vitamin K. A hundred grams of raw arugula contains 109 mcg of Vitamin K and is also rich in calcium and protein.

Arugula

Garden Cress

An ounce of cooked garden cress contains 107 mcg of Vitamin K. Garden cress is quite a healthy green and contains a good amount of Vitamin A and iron, but one needs to remember that this green is quite high in sodium.

Garden Cress

Brussels Sprouts

This crunchy vegetable also makes a good source of Vitamin K and a hundred grams of cooked Brussels sprouts contain 91.6 mcg of Vitamin K. However one should avoid overcooking this vegetable as it is eaten slightly crunchy.

Brussels sprouts

Prunes

If you particularly don’t like greens then you can still get your Vitamin K from other sources such as prunes which are basically dried plums and are rich in Vitamin K. A hundred grams of uncooked prunes contain 59.5 mcg of Vitamin K and are also rich in Vitamin A and dietary fiber. Prunes are easy to use and can easily be included in pies, tarts and puddings.

Prunes