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Top 6 Fermented Foods You Should Be Eating

Fermented Foods

Research has shown strong evidence that bacteria inside the stomach plays a key role in maintaining overall health. Fermented foods assist in digestion, make food more nutritious, and eliminate anti-nutrients. These foods also assist in healing the digestive tract and promote dental health. If you’re looking at including fermented foods in your diet, consider these top 6 foods.

Here Are The Top 6 Fermented Foods You Should Be Eating:

Non-Dairy Yogurt

Non-dairy yogurt serves as an excellent replacement for those who are lactose intolerant. Coconut yogurt serves as a dairy-free food source of probiotics. You can easily make coconut yogurt at home. Blend probiotic powder with liquid and coconut milk, after which you would need to dehydrate it at 105F for a span of 8-10 hours. If you don’t have access to a dehydrator, you can store this mixture in a dark, warm, and dry place for 10 hours. Coconut yogurt is far easier to digest than regular yogurt. Coconut also displays anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral activity, in addition to being rich in potassium, magnesium, calcium, and electrolytes.

Non-Dairy Yogurt

Tempeh

Tempeh is another fermented food that is packed with several key nutrients. Tempeh is much more nutrient-dense than tofu. Tempeh is made from fermented soybean that is derived by natural culturing, which binds the soybeans to form a cake-like structure that possesses a rough texture. The fermentation process increases the concentration of vitamins, protein, and dietary fibre. Additionally, tempeh is easy for the body to break down and digest. The rough texture of tempeh is often preferred to the soft, smooth texture of tofu. Tempeh may also serve as a healthy replacement for chicken or beef in burgers.

Tempeh

Pickles

Pickles are packed with active bacterial enzymes and cultures. It is important for you to choose lacto-fermented pickles, not the variety made with vinegar. Though these two varieties of pickles might taste exactly the same, they do not exhibit the same properties. Drink the pickle juice as well, for maximum benefits.

Pickles

Miso

Miso is a nutrient-dense food that is derived from fermented soybeans, and is a good source of zinc, antioxidants, and manganese. Miso is made by fermenting barley, rice, and soybeans, with salt and a fungus called kojikin, which forms a paste. Miso is a good source of phytonutrient antioxidants, comprising phenolic acids, such as coumaric, vanillic, ferulic, and kojic acid. Miso is often utilized in preparing soups, but it may also be used for adding taste to other dishes.

Miso

Kimchi

South Koreans are known to consume around 40 pounds of Kimchi each year. Kimchi is a type of sauerkraut that is made from red peppers, scallions, garlic, onions, and salt. While these vegetables and spices are nutrient-dense when they’re raw, their value is further enhanced due to fermentation. This nutrient-dense dish helps in relieving constipation, boosts immunity, and enables digestion of protein-rich medals. Packed with carotene and vitamin C, Kimchi may be eaten alone or added to other food preparations, such as salads, sandwiches, or burgers.

Kimchi

Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is a dish that is made from finely chopped fermented cabbage, loaded with vitamins B, C, and K. This fermented dish is packed with probiotics, such as lactobacillus, pediococcus, and leuconostoc. It is also a good dietary source of iron, which builds a strong immune system. The probiotics in sauerkraut assist in replenishing the good bacteria in the stomach, and supress the growth of harmful bacteria. Sauerkraut might assist in synthesizing B vitamins and deal with diarrhoea trigged by antibiotics. However, it is necessary to understand that heat destroys live bacteria. Therefore, by cooking or buying pasteurized sauerkraut, you will not reap the benefits of its probiotic content. Consume fresh sauerkraut or brands that include live bacteria after pasteurization.

Sauerkraut